The Selus Stone

The Selus Stone - St Just Church

The Selus Stone
The Selus Stone
The Selus Stone is thought to date from the fifth or sixth centuries, providing crucial evidence of early habitation in the area around St Just in Penwith. Originally the Romano-Christian stone was built into the church wall, close to the altar, although it was moved to stand upright on a large square base in 1824. The Selus Stone, which stands five and half feet tall, bears the Latin inscription
SELUS IC IAC-T, which translates as 'here lies Selus'. Selus, who lived in the sixth century, is also known as St Seleven, Selyf, St Levan or Seloman. He is thought to have been the brother of St Just and the Grandson of King Gerrant. On the other side of the stone is an early representational form of the cross, known as a Chi Rho cross. St Just church is an Anglo-Catholic church located just behind the main square.