King Arthur's Hall

King Arthur's Hall - Neolithic Stone Circle / Henge

King Arthur's Hall
King Arthur's Hall
King Arthur's Hall is an obscure rectangular stone enclosure measuring twenty meters wide and forty seven meters long, located near the village of St Breward on Bodmin Moor. The stones, of which fifty six out of a possible one hundred and forty are still visible, are arranged like the backs of chairs, facing inwards from a steep-sided rectangular bank. Many of the stones have fallen and still more may have been concealed due to the bank slumping. In the centre of the south side one stone has been deliberately set at right angles to the bank, although the reason for this is unclear. The middle of the enclosure is slightly hollow, with traces of rough paving in the north west corner and a tendency to flood during periods of heavy rain
King Arthur's Hall - Bodmin Moor
King Arthur's Hall - Bodmin Moor
The age and purpose of King Arthur's Hall remains shrouded in mystery, although most archaeologists agree that it probably dates from Neolithic times and had some sort of ceremonial purpose. The association with King Arthur stems from a document dated 1954, which contains the first written reference to the monument and suggests that King Arthur frequented the site. The surrounding area contains numerous stone circles, hut circles, cairns and cists. There is full open access to the site via an east-west footpath that follows the line of a Medieval boundary between the manors of Blisland and Hamatethy.