Edward Boscawen

Edward Boscawen
Edward Boscawen

Edward Boscawen was born in 1711, the third son of Viscount Falmouth. He distinguished himself in various battles against the French in the Seven years’ War, notably as commander of the “Dreadnought” in 1744, when he captured the French ship “Médée” with 800 prisoners. Following this he became known as “Old Dreadnought”.

Boscawen’s expeditions took him as far as India, where he took Madras from the French, and Nova Scotia, following his involvement in the administration of Canada. By 1758, he was an admiral and he gained a significant victory over the French Toulon fleet in 1759. As a result he received a considerable pension, command of the marines and a seat in the Privy Council. Boscawen became the Member of Parliament for Truro from 1842 - Today if you visit Truro you will find both a park and a street named after Boscawen.

He died in 1761 in Guildford, Surrey but is buried in St Michael Penkivel in Cornwall.