Men-An-Tol

Men-An-Tol Holed Stone

Men-an-Tol
Men-an-Tol
An unusual and attractive Cornish site, the Mên-an-Tol is believed to belong to the Bronze Age, thereby making it around 3,500 years old, though little evidence has been found. It consists of four stones, the most memorable being the circular and pierced upright stone. Only one other example of a holed stone exists in the county: the Tolvan Stone near Gweek.

The other three stones are more regular granite pillars commonly used in stone circles, with one dressed flat side. There is speculation that these were simply four of the stones of an ancient circle, further large stones having been discovered lying just below the ground nearby. Another theory is that these stones once formed a chamber tomb, a hole of some form apparently being quite commonly used in fertility rituals involving the passing out of exhumed bones from the tomb

Men-an-Tol on Summer Evening
Men-an-Tol
Measuring approximately 1.3metres across with a large hole at its centre, the Mên-an-Tol (meaning 'holed stone' in Cornish) has had many a curative and magical power attributed to it, certainly in terms of more recent folklore. The local moniker the 'Crick Stone' alludes to its alleged ability to aid those with back pain and children suffering from rickets and tuberculosis were also taken to this stretch of moorland near Madron in past years.

In all cases, passing through the hole was central to the healing process with importance being attached to the direction, the number of times (commonly 3 or 9) and the point on the lunar cycle. With its obvious feminine symbolism, the holed stone was also believed to aid fertility and its powers were sought by barren women, pregnant women seeking easy childbirth and famers seeking bountiful crops.